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Posts Tagged ‘Nature writing’

 

I recently completed a short photo/prose essay of nine pages entitled, For the Love of Trees. After submitting it to the editor at https://naturewriting.com – one of the leading  nature writing sites in the United States, I was delighted when the website published my book online. A link has also been added to allow its readership to download, print, and share my eBook. If you are interested in reading it, click on the following link.

https://naturewriting.com/for-the-love-of-trees /

Scroll down the page and follow the prompts. A browse of this website will also amaze you with the rich content and scope of all the writings.  Enjoy!

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birds fall silent
the sun – a rim of molten orange
over darkening hills –
another day is done

This, my 208th blog post, will be the last one for the next several months. I have been photographing, writing, and publishing these posts for 7 years and the time has come to completely free myself to work on two larger writing projects. I have enjoyed meeting so many of you and following your blogs.  Meanwhile – take pleasure in your own exciting writing and beautiful photography.

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Bauhinia variegata

Aren’t they lovely―our Hong Kong orchid trees―when they flower in multitudes of  blossoms? The five-petaled flowers, resembling orchids, appear in shades of white, pink, mauve and crimson. While this tree is native to China, it grows abundantly in tropical and subtropical regions throughout the world.

Another distinctive feature of the bauhinia lies in its unusual bi-lobed or twin lobed leaves. The resulting heart shape has given rise to the Afrikaans popular name of kamelpoot, meaning camel’s foot.

The pink and cerise toned flower of the Bauhinia blakeana, is the source of its name, Hong Kong orchid tree. An added pleasure this tree provides is the fragrant scent of its blooms. Such is its popularity that it has become the official floral emblem of the Chinese colony of Hong Kong.

Bauhenia red

The scarlet coloured blooms of the Bauhinia galpini, add a wonderful splash of colour to any garden. Growing to a height of 5 – 6 metres, when mass planted these Bauhinias create a superb hedge or a stunning line of street trees. Even after vigorous pruning they keep right on growing and blooming throughout early summer into late autumn. It seems they have the ability to carry their flowers for long periods of time.

Bauhinia variegata 1

The white Bauhinia variegata,  provides a good example of how multiples of blossoms can also decorate a single branch of this amazing species. The sight of an entire tree covered with flowers makes it quite a show stopper. Happy are those who can enjoy the pleasures provided by the Hong Kong Orchid tree.

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In the tree tops 2

When we were children, we may have had a special tree.  My own tree was located in our Southside Park, a block away from our home. Many times I climbed to its second fork, there to dream and gaze at the sky through its lace-like canopy of leaves. This tree became my refuge, and in its branches I experienced my first connection to nature and to all of life.

Great bark shot

Our park was planted with an abundance of old, established trees. These became our playground where we freely skylarked in this perfect place for hide and seek—ducking in, out, and around their broad trunks. I loved to study the shapes and textures of tree bark, letting my fingers travel over imagined roadways and discovering pictures of funny faces hiding in the rough surface. I was always happy when I spent time among the trees, and when something made me sad I cried into their trunks.

Queen's Park 1

Over the years I have studied and photographed trees, watched them grow, be felled, chipped and burned. We plant saplings to create green corridors, and embed new trees to mark the memory of someone we loved. Trees shelter us from sun and storm, their timber is used in a hundred different ways, and their beauty and strength always inspires. Trees will always remain and everything must be done to protect them and ensure their healthy living. After all – we depend on the trees breathing in sunlight and breathing out life giving oxygen to sustain our very own lives.

 

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Japanese Lake

Whew—it has been so hot for so long now. Some time ago we promised ourselves a visit to Toowoomba, our garden city, where we could cool down in its high altitude setting. Here we discovered a gorgeous Japanese themed garden, a treasure that became the perfect place in which to relax in comfort.

A formal ‘sister city’ agreement between Toowoomba and the Japanese city of Tokatsuki was officially established on the 13th November, 1991. A signed Declaration of Friendship agreed to deepen this relationship through mutually beneficial exchanges in educational, sporting, cultural, and commercial areas.

Japanese Pagoda

As Toowoomba is also the central campus for the University of Southern Queensland, its Japanese walled garden has paid a magnificent tribute to its sister city. The garden’s 3 hectare site includes elements of a mountain stream and waterfall, a dry stone garden, a central lake, azalea covered hills, and 3 kilometres of paved pathways. Many species of Japanese and Australian native trees and plants combine in seamless and restful harmony. Its name, Ju Raku En, means, ‘to enjoy peace and longevity in a public place.’

Japanese Bridge 1

Several small pagodas and wooden bench seating add spaces for rest and contemplation. Splashes of colour will also greet you in this stunning haven. While other Japanese gardens have appeared Australia wide, Ju Raku En is the largest and most developed.

In closing, I was attracted to a red Japanese gate I couldn’t resist photographing. I discovered it some time ago in the Cable Beach Resort Garden at Broome, in the Australian Kimberly Region. Its distinctive architectural form and blaze of colour cried out to me, ‘I am proudly Japanese.’ As it seemed to belong here I have included it.

Red Gate

 

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Misty sunrise 1

a rising sun
bathes the summer landscape
in soft mist

the community barbeque
a mass gathering
of mosquitoes

one whining mosquito
patrols our quiet bedroom –
no sleep tonight

Bush Fire, 1

sudden lightning strike
tinder dry bushland
explodes

summer solstice
a new tube of sun screen
and wide brimmed hat

in burning sun
mid day becomes
unendurable

summer moon
captive in a cage
of branches

 

 

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When I introduced my blog in 2011, I hoped to publish 50 posts before I ran out of ideas. What has carried me far past that goal is the development of a sketch book: crammed today with new ideas, topics, websites, scraps of poetry, and nature photos galore. It has helped me reach post 200 which features the art of photo/poetry.

The Japanese art form of Haiga, is one in which a short poem is accompanied by an image. The art lies in the relationship between the two. The image is not an illustration of the poem, nor is the poem a caption for the image. Each should stand alone, yet in juxtaposition the two must resonate to create a deeper and more complex meaning.

Traditionally haiga included two parts: an ink brush image (sumi-e), and a haiku, hand-lettered on the same paper. Today the development of digital imagery and the internet have allowed haiga to expand into new realms. Drawings or paintings are now scanned and presented with little or no adjustment, or they are manipulated in Photoshop and other software until the original is nearly unrecognizable. Photographs are often used as a starting point, or a purely digital image is created from scratch. The poem can be hand-lettered, scanned and pasted on the image, or applied directly over the image using the software’s font capability.

Below is a gallery of  my new and old selected haiga images. You may even decide to play with photo/poetry yourself, and I’d enjoy receiving samples of your work. Send your images to:  km3highnote@bigpond.com 

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