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Archive for the ‘Poetry’ Category

Photo/Poetry Reflections

clover

all need
these three things-
someone to love
something  interesting to do
and something enjoyable
to look forward to

I’ll be offline for three weeks as ‘hubs’ and I escape the everyday, to discover the freedom time away can bring. My next blog post will appear on September 24th.

If you are looking for interesting new short reads –  check out my Books & Articles tab.

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Falling petals haiga

Today we have the opportunity to take beautiful digital photos  and to add a text directly to the images. These two ingredients allow us to experiment with an early art form known as haiga. Traditionally haiga is a Japanese invention that combines a sumi-e (an image painted with an ink brush) and a three line haiku or a five line tanka poem, hand-lettered on the same piece of paper. The art lies in the subtle relationship between the two.

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The painting, drawing, or photo is not simply an illustration of the poem, nor is the poem a caption for the picture. Each element should stand alone — yet in juxtaposition, the two resonate to add a deeper and more complex meaning to the total work.

Poinsienna haiga

Drawings, paintings or photographs may be presented with little or no adjustment, or they may be manipulated until the original is nearly unrecognizable. Photographs can be used as a starting point. The text or poem can be hand lettered, scanned, pasted to the image, or applied directly using the font capability of a software program. Through haiga, the old and the new are blended into a unique, multimedia artistic experience.

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We guide our canoe through the shallows of a peaceful billabong. As the afternoon passes the water becomes as still as glass, reflecting the grotesque shapes of old rugged trees on its mirrored surface. The only sound is the gentle splash of our bow. We stop to rest—our paddles across our knees—as small droplets from the wet blades create ever-widening circular pools. Paddling closer to the edge we savour the quiet of this moment, this small gift of nature that never ceases to sustain and uplift us.

on the breeze
the distant call
of a crow

(billabong: an Australian term for the branch of a river forming a blind channel, backwater, or a stagnant pool)

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Image

Look all about you
as far as the eye can see,
how long has it been
since any rain has fallen
on this vast, drought ridden land?

Baked mounds of earth
cross hatched up and down,
cracks deep and wide
always brown, never green
aching for the smell of rain.

Dust is in the air
swirling gold and red
wherever we step,
blowing, scattering, shifting
with every breath of wind.

Call forth a rain dance
rend the heavens with prayers,
conjure up blackened clouds
and shout aloud to all who see
our pain and despair.
Australia is on its knees again
thirsting for life giving rain.

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The sunrise was glorious this morning and I’m standing under a powder blue sky, speechless at the array of flowers spread before me. Dew still clings to their vibrant petals as they lift themselves toward the sun.

The plantings in my friend’s heritage garden first captured my attention. Based on an original design from the 1840s, masses of snapdragons, forget-me-nots, scarlet impatients and brown-eyed Susans are offset by tall stalks of hollyhocks and larkspur. Beds of roses and French lavender perfume the air. Several large Mock-orange shrubs, together with mature elms and towering oaks, define the height of its scale. But I’m not here only to gaze at this lovingly tended spread on the D’Entrecasteau Peninsula, in Tasmania’s Lower Snug. I’m here on a mission with my camera, ready to capture photos of these beauties in their early morning freshness.

Later I view and edit the morning’s work on my computer screen. To my surprise other visitors―nature’s miniature helpers―also appear within the plants to feast on their sweet nectar and gather pollen. One little ant descends along the stem of a passionfruit blossom, its tiny body resembling three gleaming black beads.

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Nearly hidden from sight in the cup of a pink lily, two small ladybugs nestle. The first buzzing sound of arriving bees became a roar as they swarmed over the face of each flower, busily gathering pollen for the return flight home.

It’s an absolute delight to peer down into this minuscule universe as one insect after another comes into view. Each group is uniquely different from all the others in this kingdom. And like the flowers each one is exquisitely made.

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My camera has captured them at work. These small creatures all labour tirelessly, displaying a total dedication to their purpose. They move so quickly―with feverish speed―pausing only to connect with one another by brushing their antennas or performing a dance.

Insects keep the environment clean by carrying away decaying plant material and dead insects. They propagate the plants that feed us while their spread of pollen maintains our rich biodiversity. To ensure their protection, insects are also masters of camouflage as their bodies provide food for larger birds and animals.

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There are many variations within these tiny creatures that are as interesting to observe as the beauty of the flowers that shelter and sustain them. I have grown to enjoy insects because they are so unusual. It’s fun to watch and study them in our world of living creations, both great and small.

 

 

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Today we have the opportunity to take beautiful digital photos and to add a text directly to the image. These two ingredients allow us to experiment with an early art form known as haiga. Traditionally haiga is a Japanese invention combining a sumi-e (inkbrush image) and a three line haiku or a five line tanka poem, hand-lettered on the same paper. The art lies in the subtle relationship between the two.

The painting, drawing or photo is not simply an illustration of the poem, nor is the poem a caption for the picture. Each element should stand alone – yet in juxtaposition, the two resonate to add a deeper and more complex meaning to the total work.

Drawings, paintings or photos may be presented with little or no adjustment, or they may be manipulated until the original is nearly unrecognizable. Photographs can be used as a starting point. The poem can be hand lettered, scanned, pasted to the image, or applied directly using the font capability of a software program.

Through haiga, the old and new are blended into a unique multimedia artistic experience.

Read Full Post »