Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘floral photography’ Category

When I introduced my blog in 2011, I hoped to publish 50 posts before I ran out of ideas. What has carried me far past that goal is the development of a sketch book: crammed today with new ideas, topics, websites, scraps of poetry, and nature photos galore. It has helped me reach post 200 which features the art of photo/poetry.

The Japanese art form of Haiga, is one in which a short poem is accompanied by an image. The art lies in the relationship between the two. The image is not an illustration of the poem, nor is the poem a caption for the image. Each should stand alone, yet in juxtaposition the two must resonate to create a deeper and more complex meaning.

Traditionally haiga included two parts: an ink brush image (sumi-e), and a haiku, hand-lettered on the same paper. Today the development of digital imagery and the internet have allowed haiga to expand into new realms. Drawings or paintings are now scanned and presented with little or no adjustment, or they are manipulated in Photoshop and other software until the original is nearly unrecognizable. Photographs are often used as a starting point, or a purely digital image is created from scratch. The poem can be hand-lettered, scanned and pasted on the image, or applied directly over the image using the software’s font capability.

Below is a gallery of  my new and old selected haiga images. You may even decide to play with photo/poetry yourself, and I’d enjoy receiving samples of your work. Send your images to:  km3highnote@bigpond.com 

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

The hills are alive with the sight of blossoms. Our early summer presented us with an abundance of flowering trees, dressed in clusters of gorgeous colour. Is this the result of all those recent summer storms that gave everything a good drenching? I suspect it is.

First to blossom are the Jacarandas, Jacaranda mimosifolia. These stately trees produce exquisite clusters of lavender blooms. Each individual bell shaped floret combines into groups of similar flowers that smother the branches. Delicate fern-like green leaves surround the blossoms. Not only do these stately trees create a superb display when they are mass planted, but Jacarandas also look stunning on their own.

We mistakenly think that Jacarandas are natives, as they adapt and grow profusely in all tropical and warm temperate zones. Originally found only in Brazil, these trees are deciduous. They briefly drop their leaves at the end of the dry winter season, then bloom and leaf up again when the warm spring rains return.

As the Jacaranda flowers fade and fall the Tabebuia trees burst into bloom. They decorate themselves in clusters of frilly, bell shaped flowerets—similar to the Jacaranda blossoms. Their colour and profusion creates a jaw-dropping spectacle, through the rich pink of the Tabebuia rosea, to the vibrant yellow gold of the Tabebuia aurea. These beauties are a genus of flowering plants in the family, Bignoniacae.

Tabebuia trees are native to tropical Central and South America and they flourish from Mexico and Cuba to Argentina. In summer their flowers burst into dazzing pink or yellow, with small green leaves following the blooms later. Everyone loves them.

Now that a new year is upon us, all these trees have left their glorious colour behind. When they do bloom again we must savour their beauty, as each flowering season is so brief. Jacarandas and Tabebuias are marvellously photogenic, and once their blossom time is over, it is a long wait for the next breathtaking display.

 

Read Full Post »

Bloomomg bed

   “The beauty of that day was almost staggering. After the wet spring, everything that could turn green had outdone itself in greenness and everything that could even dream of blooming or blossoming was in bloom and blossom. The sunlight was a benediction. The breezes were so caressingly soft and intimate on the skin as to be embarrassing.”

Dan Simmonds, Drood

Read Full Post »

Carnival of Flowers 3

For ten glorious days in October, the garden city of Toowoomba plays host to a Carnival of Flowers. Australia’s most populated inland city is nestled high in the woodlands, along the crest of the Great Dividing Mountain Range. Boasting more than 150 parks and gardens, Toowoomba enjoys four distinct seasons, rich deposits of volcanic soil, and an altitude suitable for growing an endless variety of trees and flowers.

Festival of Flowers

During the carnival, the city bursts into life with visitors from near and far as they enjoy the Grand Parade of floral floats, marching brass and pipe bands, and street performances. Everyone enters enthusiastically  into the various garden competitions. The carnival agenda always culminates with a visit to Queens Park, to enjoy and photograph breathtaking displays of floral designs, set out in a riot of shapes and colours.

Toowoomba Festival

A not-to-be-missed visit to Picnic Point and the University of Southern Queensland’s Japanese Garden will further enhance each visit. The carnival’s floral and garden design classes, the accompanying wine and locally grown food festival, superb restaurants and cafes, and concerts galore, all add to Toowoomba’s unique celebration of nature, in all her glory.

Read Full Post »