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Archive for November, 2017

After our first visit to 1770, nearly 40 years ago, we recently enjoyed a return trip. No, we are not time travellers, able to move freely into our future or past. 1770 is a hinterland town located on Queensland’s northern coast. It is the only town in Australia whose name is written as a date, in a sequence of four numbers. Thankfully 1770 has remained untouched by developers, and can rightly boast of its pristine beaches, several unspoiled national parks, a spread of wonderful scenery, and an amazing look-out, constructed atop Round Hill. It is a perfect beach holiday spot for those who enjoy roughing it.

Why has this settlement been named 1770? On Wednesday the 23rd of May 1770, an auspicious traveller, Captain James Cook arrived. Happily for us he decided to pay a visit. It was his second and final landing on our Australian shores. The following extracts from the log of Cook’s vessel, the HMS Endeavour, give us a lively account of this stopover.

Wednesday 23 May
“Early next morning I went ashore with a party of men to explore the country. The country here is manifestly worse than Botany Bay: the soil is dry and sandy, but the hills are covered with palm-nut trees. Upon the shore we saw a species of the bustard, one of which we shot. It was as large as a turkey and weighed seventeen pounds and a half. After roasting it we all agreed this was the best bird we had eaten, and in honour of it we named this inlet, Bustard Bay.”

Accompanying Captain Cook were several soldiers and the botanist, Joseph Banks, who spent his brief time ashore collecting 33 new plant species. Captain Cook was always on the move so on the following day, Thursday the 24th May he noted –

“At four o’clock in the morning, and with a gentle breeze south, made sail out of the bay.”

At the top of a hill directly above the actual beach where Captain Cook landed, a large stone cairn has been erected. Many travellers enjoy not only this pristine natural environment, but come to experience a place of significance to our early colonial history. The monument is a fitting way to mark the achievements of the 18th century’s finest navigator, Captain James Cook, the Father of Australia.

Best wishes for a happy holiday season.
My next blog post will appear in mid-January, 2018.

 

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The hinterland town of Tamborine Village, perched high above the rolling hills of Mount Tamborine, plays host to 5,000 permanent residents and an endless flow of tourists. Settlement is centred here in three village communities: North Tamborine, Eagle Heights and Mount Tamborine. Crisp mountain air mingles with the aromas of coffee, local wine and beer, while friendly chatter is exchanged alongside fresh produce sourced directly from the farm gate.

With its breathtaking scenery and mountain views, Tamborine has become a haven for creatives: painters, crafts people, writers, and photographers. Fine chefs also ensure the cooking and eating opportunities are second to none. This entire vibrant community thrives on its creativity and inclusiveness.

Located on South East Queensland’s Scenic Rim, the name, Tamborine, has nothing to do with the musical instrument. Its origins were derived from a local Aboriginal word, Goombirren which means ‘wild lime.’ No doubt this refers to the finger lime trees that grow abundantly on the mountain and form a staple food in the Aboriginal diet. 

Gardening is a much loved pastime and magnificent spreads of flowers, fruit trees and vegetable patches abound. A beautiful collection of dahlias grows in the back garden of St Bernards Hotel and is always a special delight to visit. In addition to several hectares of manicured lawns and colourful garden beds, St Bernards is a genuine historic hotel, established in the 1880s. Its mountain top site offers magnificent views of Guanaba Gorge and the Gold Coast. The dining rooms also serve fabulous food, seven days a week.

It may be only an hour’s drive from Brisbane, but Tamborine Mountain makes you feel as though you have entered a magical world far away. With its stunningly beautiful national parks and rain forests, this picturesque area in the Scenic Rim is home to some of the most fertile land in Queensland. A host of accommodation offers misty mountain views, where we enjoyed our morning coffee from the veranda of our cottage. Watching the sunshine slowly burn off a cloud of morning mist has remained a cherished memory.

If you ever visit, pack a camera. You’ll be needing it!

 

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