Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for October, 2017

Mother Earth offers us a rich banquet of beautiful trees, foliage and flowers for our enjoyment. In the loveliest time of our year—late spring to early summer—we anticipate and welcome the blossoming of our amazing roses. Over the years I have photographed many of these Australian  blooms, in their natural habitats and individually as floral portraits. The following gallery showcases six of these roses adorned in all their glory. I hope you enjoy them as much as I have.

 

“What a lovely thing a rose is!”
Arthur Conan Doyle

 

“A thorn defends the rose,
harming only those who would
steal the blossom”
Chinese Proverb

 

 

“The rose is a flower of love.”
Anon

 

“A rose must remain with the sun and the rain,
or its lovely promise won’t come true.”
Ray Evans

 

“A rose is without explanation;
she blooms because she blooms.”
Angelus Selisius

 

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

Tired? Stressed? Too much work, shopping, and time spent tethered to a screen? Perhaps a break is needed in which to do some quiet forest bathing.

Forest bathing first originated in Japan where it is known as shinrin-yoku. There are no fluffy towels, soy candles, or scented soaps involved because shinrin-yoku is a slow and tranquil walk through a pristine wilderness. It can become an uplifting experience – one with many well documented health benefits.

Alone or in a small group, select a forest with shrubs, ferns and a good density of old established trees. Stand among them for several moments, breathing slowly to release your mental chatter. When you feel a sense of inner quiet, place your attention on the natural world and begin a deliberately slow walk.

Try to engage all your senses by touching the textures of plants and tree trunks, listening to the quiet murmur of the forest environment and the occasional ring of birdsong. Focus your eyes on the surrounding scenery as you inhale and taste the aromas of the foliage. Essential oils are emitted from plants and trees to protect them from insects and predators, and this phenomenon has been described as, ‘natural aromatherapy.’ Through the stillness and your sense of immersion in nature, an experience of inner peace will grow within you.

The Japanese have a word, karoshi, which means death by overwork. There is so much stress among ordinary Japanese people, they were the first to recognize this problem and develop a way to deal with it. Studies have been conducted in Japan by Dr Quing Li, an Associate Professor at Tokyo’s Nippon Medical School. His scientific data has proven that forest bathing can lead to a boost in one’s immune function and mood. A forest walk has also been hailed as a legitimate therapy for preventing hyper tension, depression and stress.

Here in Australia another initiative that aims to connect people with nature is found in the organization, Healthy Parks – Healthy People. Check out its website, one that is both interesting and information rich, at www.hphpcentral.com

To gain maximum benefit from a forest walk, rest when you feel tired and drink water if you are thirsty. Take plenty of time to sit and engage with the scenery, or read a book. Forest bathing is freely available for everyone to enjoy. Shinrin-Yoku’s central idea is to allow nature the quiet time and space in which to work its magic on you.

 

Read Full Post »