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Archive for December, 2012

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laughing and singing
we unpack the decorations
to trim our Christmas tree,
as the youngest child
hangs all the stars
on the lowest branch

Have a happy Christmas season filled with peace, love and joy. I’ll be offline for several weeks, then back with new contributions to my blog again in mid-January. It’s time to let creative energies take a rest  while other ideas and projects simmer away behind the scenes.

See you then.

God Bless,
Mary

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through soft mist
the repeated call
of one crow

Walking quietly in the late afternoon chill, with foliage deepened into shade and a rim of orange over darkening hills, I reach the gate then cross the threshold breathing in the scent of slow cooking over the last embers of a fire … red wine poured into gleaming crystal glasses and a candlelit table set for two …

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radiant moon
captive in a cage
of branches

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Viridian

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Colour my world green in rich hues of emerald, chartreuse, jade, lime, olive, asparagus and the greenery of grass and foliage that signifies rest—regeneration—rebirth. It was from the early Romans that Venus, the goddess of gardens, vegetables and vineyards, first became associated with the colour green. Later, a natural green dye was produced from living plants when cloth was dyed blue with woad, then dipped again into a tub of yellow weed solution.

Bring me celadon and malachite used by medieval monks, painters and scribes. These early artists also produced their own green pigments by pounding yellow ochre and blue azurlite together to mix with an egg yolk and water for their tempera paint. The egg yolk and water mixture was the perfect medium in which to bind the pigment particles. This paint is long-lasting too, as tempera paintings from the 1st century still exist today.

Tropical plants

Many natural earth hues are identified as moss green, sea green, fern green, forest green, hunter green, apple green and mint green. All of nature’s green verdure occurs organically because each living plant contains chlorophyll. Chlorophyll draws energy from sunlight then uses this as a fuel to convert carbon dioxide and water into glucose. This process—known as photosynthesis—produces the natural sugar that feeds and nourishes a plant, allowing it to grow, to mature, to bear fruit and produce seed.

The word, green, first appears in the Middle and Old English word: grene, and is derived from the same root word as grass and grow. We see the colour green when we look at light with a wave length of roughly 520 – 570 nanometers. Green is associated with springtime, freshness and hope, and to be identified as one having a ‘green thumb’ is a compliment and a delight for all gardeners. In today’s world to be a ‘greenie’ distinguishes a person who cares deeply about maintaining and sustaining our natural environment and resources. On the negative side, the ‘green eyed monster’ signifies a jealous or envious person while a ‘greenhorn’ is a bumbling, inexperienced one.

Green garden foliage, 3

Nothing provides greater comfort that surrounding ourselves with an abundance of verdant greenery and herbage. I love living in a green world that is steeped in viridian.

 

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lines of poppies
stragglers beneath
the soldier’s honour roll
like a ragged wound
blood red

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Winter Magic

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thick hoar-frost
covers my window
in silver light

Ice shapes resembling small fir trees stretch across the glass, while delicate snow flowers sparkle around them.  Lost in its beauty I move through this crystal garden as my warm fingers trace up and down, leaving a smudged pathway …

Mother’s voice interrupts, ‘Susan, come away from that cold window and get dressed or the school bus will leave without you!’

burning hoop pine
scent of a warm kitchen
oatmeal with brown sugar

 

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